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2016

Tuesday, November 15, 2016
Hannah Arendt, James Baldwin,
and the Politics of Kinship
Siobhan Phillips, Associate Professor of English
Dickinson College

RKC 103  6:30 pm
In the crucial years of the early 1960s, both Hannah Arendt and James Baldwin identified the problems of U.S. history as, in part, problems of kinship—affiliations created and distorted when the exigencies of human vulnerability must be satisfied in a liberal society structured by race slavery. Both distrusted the model of family they saw around them; both used the specific problems of that model to imagine different and more democratic relationships. The results challenge current conceptions of both Arendt and Baldwin by uncovering how their psychological acuity supports their historical/ethical vision. This talk aims to recognize the resources of that vision, then and now.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Hannah Arendt Center; Literature Program
Matthew Mutter  845-758-6822  mmutter@bard.edu
  Monday, November 14, 2016
The Rhode Island Revolution:
The Triumph of Roger Williams
Rockwell Stensrud
Olin, Room 202  4:45 pm
In his long life, during one of the most dynamic periods in English history, Roger Williams (1603-1683) altered the values and the direction of the New World, and he did it with flair. After being banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1635 for sedition, Williams founded Providence with the help of Narragansett and Wampanoag Indians. He insisted that Rhode Island break with the past and honor freedom of conscience for all inhabitants, and that church and state remain separate. By the early 1640s, those dangerous tenets had become a legislative possibility; two decades later they were a reality. The nation that emerged a century and a half later as the United States of America was a direct descendant of Roger Williams’s Rhode Island revolution.

Rockwell Stensrud is the author of Newport: A Lively Experiment 1639-1969 and Inventing Rhode Island: Six Lives. He wrote and co-produced the ABC News series The History of the Eighties; James Cagney for A&E “Biography”; and the series American Women of Achievement.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Dean of the College; Historical Studies Program
Cecile Kuznitz  845-758-6822  kuznitz@bard.edu
Monday, October 24, 2016
Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II
A Lecture by Farah Jasmine Griffin
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  4:30 pm
Farah Jasmine Griffin, William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University

"Her body in the air looked like an abstract sculpture," Griffin writes of Pearl Primus's dance in the 1840s.  

"In her book “Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II,[2013]” Farah Jasmine Griffin, a professor at Columbia University, delves into a largely underexplored aspect of Harlem’s rich history: the years just before, during and immediately after World War II, a period of optimism, creativity and turmoil. Moreover, Griffin uses the lives of three female artists — the choreographer and dancer Pearl Primus, the writer Ann Petry and the composer and pianist Mary Lou Williams — as signposts through an era, in a work that paints the “greatest generation” in a much less flattering light than do the usual jingoistic accounts."  ~The New York Times

Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Dance Program; Difference and Media Project; Historical Studies Program; Literature Program
Myra Armstead  845-758-6822  armstead@bard.edu
  Thursday, October 20, 2016
"In Poor Taste: Thoughts on Sugar, Labor, and the Special Commodity"
 
Anjuli Raza Kolb, Williams College
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:00 pm
This talk posits zombi as an immanent theory of labor, consumption, and the material itinerary of what we call taste. Beginning with an account of Marx’s special commodity, Professor Raza Kolb will explore how production and consumption crystallize into a set of signs pointing beyond allegories of monstrosity, and beyond a West Indian aesthetics bounded by capital in the age of empire and today.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Experimental Humanities Program; Human Rights Program; LAIS Program
Alex Benson  845-758-6822  abenson@bard.edu
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Presidential Debate
Broadcast in BOTH Weis Cinema and the Multipurpose Room
 

Weis Cinema and Multipurpose Room, Bertelsmann Campus Center  9:00 pm – 11:55 am
Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; Election@Bard and the Bard Debate Union
Jonathan Becker  845-758-7378  jbecker@bard.edu
Sunday, October 9, 2016
Presidential Debate
Broadcast in BOTH Weis Cinema and the Multipurpose Room
 

Weis Cinema and Multipurpose Room, Bertelsmann Campus Center  9:00 pm – 11:55 am
Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; Election@Bard and the Bard Debate Union
Jonathan Becker  845-758-7378  jbecker@bard.edu
Thursday, October 6, 2016
Visual Attention as Ethical Action:
Tolstoy - Cézanne - Salgado
Thomas Pfau, Alice Mary Baldwin Professor of English, Professor & Chair of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Duke Divinity School
RKC 103  5:00 pm
This lecture will explore three case studies of visual attention and its ethical dimensions: a photograph by Sebastião Salgado; two paintings by Cézanne discussed by R. M. Rilke, and the harvesting scene opening Part III of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina. In each instance, Thomas Pfau's focus will be on how the response elicited by a specific image triggers a distinctive ethical insight, a type of knowledge impossible to capture in propositional terms and achievable only through the medium of the image. The ethics of attention solicited by the image and subsequently articulated in writing involves empathy and, ultimately, demands a kind of participatory action on the part of the beholder. The lecture's overriding aim is to present attention as a form of knowledge neither "owned" nor "controlled" by the beholding subject but, on the contrary, transformative of the beholder.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; German Studies Program; Hannah Arendt Center; Literature Program
Matthew Mutter  845-758-6822  mmutter@bard.edu
Monday, September 26, 2016
First Presidential Debate
Broadcast in BOTH Weis Cinema and the Multipurpose Room
 

Weis Cinema and Multipurpose Room, Bertelsmann Campus Center  9:00 pm – 11:55 am
Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; Election@Bard and the Bard Debate Union
Jonathan Becker  845-758-7378  jbecker@bard.edu
Monday, September 26, 2016
"The Archive of the Archive: An Ontology of Indigenous Sound Recordings"
Aaron A. Fox, Columbia University
Olin, Room 102  5:00 pm
In this paper I examine the documentary trail of legal agreements, memoranda, correspondence, and contracts that mark the history of the “Laura Boulton Collection’s” acquisition by Columbia University as intellectual property, and the subsequent distribution and management of the associated rights by Columbia, Indiana University, and the Library of Congress. My argument is that this hidden "archive of the archive” provides the necessary context for understanding what “the archive” is. While the ostensible motivation for this construction was scientific and scholarly, I show that every actor in the story had a covert economic interest in the fiction that the collection was a unitary object that could be owned, sold, or transferred in the name of science.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Anthropology Program; Ethnomusicology; Experimental Humanities Program; Global and International Studies Program
Alex Benson   845-758-7284  abenson@bard.edu
  Thursday, May 5, 2016
PEEP!
student curated short-film screenings inspired by PEEP cinema
Preston  5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Students Grace Calderly and Lian Ladia curate a selection of short films focused on "the insider looking or in" and the return of the gaze in the idea of peep cinema. This film program is the students final project for Curating Cinema at CCS Bard.

Lian Ladia  845-594-1704  jl6096@bard.edu
Tuesday, May 3, 2016
Designing a Mapping Assignment
Henderson 106  3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Experimental Humanities Workshop Series
On Mapping
Spring 2016
This workshop series will offer participants introductions to a range of tools for mapping projects in the classroom and in research. All workshops will begin at 3:00 pm in Henderson Annex 106. Experimental Humanities Open Labs follow immediately after in this space where you are welcome to stay to continue working on the mapping tutorials.Sign up for one or all of the workshops at http://goo.gl/forms/9BlZfDpyWj


April 5
Designing a Mapping AssignmentThe first workshop will introduce strategies for planning a mapping project in your course. Introduction to a few web-based platforms that are user-friendly, intuitive, and great for short-term assignments. Hands-on training for using StoryMap JS (including using Gigapixel), ThingLink, and Timescape.


April 19
Neatline (Omeka)Introduction to Neatline, a mapping and annotation tool available via the Omeka web publishing platform. Hands-on training for creating a Neatline exhibit including adding records, creating waypoints, incorporating a timeline and working with image layers.


May 3
Historic MappingHands-on training for georeferencing historic maps, using Map Warper, adding historic data, and instruction for different publishing outputs, including CartoDB and DH Press (a WordPress plugin).

Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Gretta Tritch Roman  845-758-6822  gtritchr@bard.edu
Thursday, April 21, 2016
The Language of Music in Early Modern Encounters
Karen Ordahl Kupperman
Olin, Room 102  3:00 pm
As Europeans moved into the Atlantic, they faced the problem of communicating with people in Africa and in the Americas without any language in common.  The Europeans' solution was to sing and play musical instruments, and they were delighted to find that the people they encountered did the same.  A musical approach was taken to be welcoming, but both sides found the other could also use music to deceive.  Ultimately, stories of these encounters led Europeans to ponder the nature of language itself.  
 

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Experimental Humanities Program; Theater and Performance Program
Christian Crouch  845-758-6874  crouch@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 19, 2016
Experimental Humanities Mapping Workshop Series #2 Neatline (Omeka)
Henderson 106  3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Introduction to Neatline, a mapping and annotation tool available via the Omeka web publishing platform. Hands-on training for creating a Neatline exhibit including adding waypoints, incorporating a timeline and working with image layers.
 Experimental Humanities Workshop Series
On Mapping
Spring 2016
This workshop series will offer participants introductions to a range of tools for mapping projects in the classroom and in research. All workshops will begin at 3:00 pm in Henderson Annex 106. Experimental Humanities Open Labs follow immediately after in this space where you are welcome to stay to continue working on the mapping tutorials.Sign up for one or all of the workshops at http://goo.gl/forms/9BlZfDpyWj
Upcoming Workshop
May 3
Historic MappingHands-on training for georeferencing historic maps, using Map Warper, adding historic data, and instruction for different publishing outputs, including CartoDB and DH Press (a WordPress plugin).

Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Gretta Tritch Roman  845-758-6822  gtritchr@bard.edu
  Thursday, April 14, 2016
The Revolt against the Indies Company: Saint-Domingue, 1722-1724
Malick W. Ghachem
Associate Professor of History, MIT

Reem-Kayden Center Room 102  4:45 pm
Malick W. Ghachem is a historian and lawyer. His primary areas of concentration are slavery and abolition, criminal law, and constitutional history. He is the author of The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2012), a history of the law of slavery in Saint-Domingue (Haiti) between 1685 and 1804. The book received the American Historical Association’s J. Russell Major Prize for the best work in English on French history and was co-winner of the Caribbean Studies Association’s Gordon K. and Sybil Lewis Prize for the best book published in the field of Caribbean studies over the past three years. He teaches courses on the Age of Revolution, Slavery and Abolition, American criminal justice, and other topics.

Professor Ghachem earned his undergraduate and law degrees from Harvard University and his doctorate in history from Stanford. He clerked for the Honorable Rosemary Barkett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit in Miami, FL in 2004. A member of the Massachusetts bar, Professor Ghachem practiced law in Boston from 2005 to 2010 for two law firms: Zalkind, Rodriguez, Lunt & Duncan LLP and Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP. For part of that period (2006-2007) he served as a lecturer in MIT’s Political Science Department. Between 2010 and 2013, he taught at the University of Maine School of Law in Portland, ME, where he is now a Senior Scholar.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; French Studies Program; Historical Studies Program
Tabetha Ewing  845-758-7548  ewing@bard.edu
Monday, April 11, 2016
Excellent Daughters: The Secret Lives of Young Women Who Are Transforming the Arab World
Katherine Zoepf
Olin, Room 202  6:30 pm
For more than a decade, Katherine Zoepf has lived in or traveled throughout the Arab world, reporting on the lives of women, whose role in the region has never been more in flux. Only a generation ago, female adolescence as we know it in the West did not exist in the Middle East. There were only children and married women. Today, young Arab women outnumber men in universities, and a few are beginning to face down religious and social tradition in order to live independently, to delay marriage, and to pursue professional goals. Hundreds of thousands of devout girls and women are attending Qur’anic schools—and using the training to argue for greater rights and freedoms from an Islamic perspective. And, in 2011, young women helped to lead antigovernment protests in the Arab Spring.  In Syria, before its civil war, Zoepf documents a complex society in the midst of soul searching about its place in the world and about the role of women. In Lebanon, she documents a country that on the surface is freer than other Arab nations but whose women must balance extreme standards of self-presentation with Islamic codes of virtue. In Abu Dhabi, Zoepf reports on a generation of Arab women who’ve found freedom in work outside the home. In Saudi Arabia she chronicles driving protests and women entering the retail industry for the first time. In the aftermath of Tahrir Square, she examines the crucial role of women in Egypt's popular uprising.  This reading will illuminate some of the voices Zoepf showcases in her book.  Katherine Zoepf lived in Syria and Lebanon from 2004 to 2007 while working as a stringer for The New York Times; she also worked in the Times's Baghdad bureau in 2008. Since 2010, she has been a fellow at New America. Her work has appeared in The New York Observer, The Chronicle of Higher EducationThe New York Times Magazine, and The New Yorker, among other publications. She is a graduate of Princeton University and the London School of Economics. 

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program
Christian Crouch  845-758-6874  crouch@bard.edu
Friday, April 8, 2016
Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice
April 7-8, 2016 at Bard College
a two day symposium exploring the place of sound in the arts, sciences, and humanities

Blum  9:00 am
Friday, April 8 @Blum

9am Prelude
Georgian Polyphony Workshop with Carl Linich

10am  Aurality
A panel discussion with Tomie Hahn (RPI), Brian Hochman (Georgetown University), Julianne Swartz (Bard College), & Amanda Weidman (Bryn Mawr College)
Chaired by Alex Benson (Bard College0

11:30am  Interlude
Physics of Sound with Matthew Deady
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

1:00pm  Transmission
A panal discussion with Masha Godovannaya (Smolny College), Tom Porcello (Vassar College), Drew Thompson (Bard College0, and Olga Touloumi (Bard College0
Chaired by Danielle Riou (Bard College)

2:30pm Interlude
Oral History Workshop with Suzanne Snider
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

3:30pm  Resonance
A panel discussion with Marie Abe (Boston University), Emilio Distretti (Al-Quds), Erica Robles-Anderson (NYU), Maria Sonevytsky (Bard College), & David Suisman (University of Delaware)
Chaired by Laura Kunreuther

5:00pm  Deep Listening Workshop
with Pauline Oliveros

6:00pm  Closing Remarks
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 

Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Anthropology Program; Art History Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Computer Science Program; Dean of the College; Division of Languages and Literature; Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing; Division of Social Studies; Division of the Arts; Experimental Humanities Program; Film and Electronic Arts Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Office of the President; Physics Program; Studio Arts Program
Laura Kunreuther  845-758-7215  kunreuth@bard.edu
  Thursday, April 7, 2016
Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice
April 7-8, 2016 at Bard College
a two day symposium exploring the place of sound in the arts, sciences, and humanities

László Z. Bitó '60 Conservatory Building  2:30 pm
Thursday, April 7 @Bito

2:30pm Opening Lecture
Emily Thompson (Princeton University)
Sound Theory as Sound Practice

4pm  Exhinition Opening
Featuring work by Lesley Flanigan, Tristan Perich, Natalia Fedorova, and Bard College faculty and students

5:30pm Keynote Lecture
Jonathan Sterne
Professor and James McGill Chair in
Culture & Technology, McGill University
Audile Scarification:
Notes on the Normalization of Hearing Damage
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 

Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Anthropology Program; Art History Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Computer Science Program; Dean of the College; Division of Languages and Literature; Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing; Division of Social Studies; Division of the Arts; Experimental Humanities Program; Film and Electronic Arts Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Office of the President; Physics Program; Studio Arts Program
Laura Kunreuther  845-758-7215  kunreuth@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 5, 2016
Designing a Mapping Assignment
Henderson 106  3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Experimental Humanities Workshop Series
On Mapping
Spring 2016
This workshop series will offer participants introductions to a range of tools for mapping projects in the classroom and in research. All workshops will begin at 3:00 pm in Henderson Annex 106. Experimental Humanities Open Labs follow immediately after in this space where you are welcome to stay to continue working on the mapping tutorials.Sign up for one or all of the workshops at http://goo.gl/forms/9BlZfDpyWj


April 5
Designing a Mapping AssignmentThe first workshop will introduce strategies for planning a mapping project in your course. Introduction to a few web-based platforms that are user-friendly, intuitive, and great for short-term assignments. Hands-on training for using StoryMap JS (including using Gigapixel), ThingLink, and Timescape.


April 19
Neatline (Omeka)Introduction to Neatline, a mapping and annotation tool available via the Omeka web publishing platform. Hands-on training for creating a Neatline exhibit including adding records, creating waypoints, incorporating a timeline and working with image layers.


May 3
Historic MappingHands-on training for georeferencing historic maps, using Map Warper, adding historic data, and instruction for different publishing outputs, including CartoDB and DH Press (a WordPress plugin).

Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Gretta Tritch Roman  845-758-6822  gtritchr@bard.edu
Thursday, March 31, 2016
Common Ground: Indigenous Shakespeares
Olin, Room 202  6:15 pm
What is it about the work of a playwright who crafted his last drama in 1611 that appeals so widely to Native Peoples in America today? Is it the colonial connection? The flexibility of the language? The need for a voice in the western world? Or something more? 

Director Madeline Sayet, having recently launched Amerinda (American Indian Artists) Inc.'s new Shakespeare Ensemble, interrogates the recent surge in Native Shakespeare productions and adaptations and why these stories keep calling to us. We will explore which of Shakespeare's plays most facilitate these interrogations and how we can all make space for ourselves in history and in the world through these words. 400 years after Shakespeare's death, his texts may be more relevant than ever.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Bard Theater and Performance Program; Experimental Humanities Program
Miriam Felton-Dansky  845-758-7960  mdansky@bard.edu
Tuesday, March 15, 2016
Immersing Miami
Alexandra T. Vazquez, Associate Professor,
Department of Performance Studies, New York University

RKC 103  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
This talk involves a willful submerging into the performance ecologies of Miami, Florida. The city, too often made mere fulcrum for many a geopolitical before and after, holds rich and established resources for creative practices. Far beyond a cultural wasteland or cold war terminus, Miami's artists have long made things from vast distances, inside precarious currents, outside of their families. “Immersing Miami” is and isn’t about the city; it is an exercise on how to write through the intimacies of the local and out towards parallel gatherings. The talk specifically works with the 1998 “Speed Split” series by the Cuban born, Miami-based artist Consuelo Castañeda (b. 1958) as an opportunity to transpose an artist’s visual mode into a musical response to displacement and dispossession. Castañeda extends a call to listen on the insides of the alienating narratives that drown Miami and in doing so enables us to hear robust aesthetic histories everywhere else.

Alexandra T. Vazquez was born in Miami, Florida. She is Associate Professor in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University. Her book, Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music (Duke University Press 2013), won the American Studies Association’s Lora Romero Book Prize in 2014. Vazquez’s work has been featured in the journals American Quarterly, Social Text, women and performance, and the Journal of Popular Music Studies, and in the edited volumes Reggaeton and Pop When the World Falls Apart.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Ethnomusicology; LAIS Program; Literature Program
Maria Sonevytsky   845-752-2405  msonevyt@bard.edu
Thursday, March 10, 2016
A Reading by John Keene
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The celebrated and award-winning author of books including Annotations and, most recently, Counternarratives reads from his work at 6:00 p.m. in  Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, on Thursday, March 10th. Introduced by Mary Caponegro and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Books will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.

John R. Keene's Counternarratives, a collection of stories and novellas, draws upon memoirs, newspaper accounts, detective stories, interrogation transcripts, and speculative fiction to create new and strange perspectives on our past and present. "An Outtake" chronicles an escaped slave's take on liberty and the American Revolution. "The Strange History of Our Lady of the Sorrows" presents a bizarre series of events that unfold in a nineteenth-century Kentucky convent. "The Aeronauts" soars between bustling Philadelphia, still-rustic Washington, and the theater of the U.S. Civil War. In "Acrobatique," the subject of a famous Edgar Degas painting talks back. And the hotly debated, widely praised story "Rivers" presents a free Jim meeting up decades later with his former raftmate Huckleberry Finn.
 *
PRAISE FOR Counternarratives

"Keene exerts superb control over his stories, costuming them in the style of Jorge Luis Borges …Yet he preserves the undercurrent of excitement and pathos that accompanies his characters' persecution and their groping toward freedom." —Wall Street Journal

"An extraordinary work of literature. John Keene is a dense, intricate, and magnificent writer. " —Harper's

"Suspenseful, thought provoking, mystical, and haunting. Keene's confident writing doesn't aim for easy description or evaluation; it approaches (and defies) literature on its own terms." —Publishers Weekly

"Only a few, John Keene among them, in our age, authentically test the physics of fiction as both provocation and mastery. Continuing what reads like the story collection as freedom project, in Counternarratives, Keene opens swaths of history for readers to more than imagine but to manifest and live in the passionate language of conjure and ritual." —Major Jackson

"Keene finds inspiration in newspaper clippings, memoirs, and history, and anchors them in the eternal, universal, and mystical." —Vanity Fair

"John Keene undertakes a kind of literary counterarchaeology, a series of fictions that challenge our notion of what constitutes 'real' or 'accurate' history. His writing is at turns playful and erudite, lyric and coldly diagnostic, but always completely absorbing. Counternarratives could easily be compared to Borges or Bolano, Calvino or Kiš, but at the same time it is a deeply American, resolutely contemporary book, that asks us to reconsider our own perspectives on the past―and the future." —Jess Row

"Of the scope of William T. Vollmann or Samuel R. Delany, but with a kaleidoscopic intuition all its own, Counternarratives is very easily one of the most vividly imagined and vitally timed books of the year. I haven't felt so refreshed in quite a while as a reader." —VICE

"Keene opens up the spaces between words and their objects, to create room where fresh meanings can play." —The Nation

"Queering the script, defying the imperative to be silent, does not require confidence or a vision of what progress means. It is, rather, in all its uncertainty and risk, the most basic stuff of―the very matter of―life. It is also the crowning achievement of one of the year's very best books." —The Quarterly Conversation

"Keene's collection of short and longer historical fictions are formally varied, mold-breaking, and deeply political. He's a radical artist working in the most conservative genres, and any search for innovation in this year's U.S. fiction should start here." —Vulture

"A series of stories in which religion and spirituality, art and language, violence and subjugation, homosexuality and eroticism, may shine through a panoply of voices." —Full Stop

"Practically every sentence in the book perforates, stretches out, or pries open literary modes designed to be airtight, restrictive, and racially exclusionary … An expert generator of suspense, Keene also turns out to be a skilled humorist, a mischievous ironist, a deft, seductive storyteller and a studied historian." —Bookforum

PRAISE FOR ANNOTATIONS

"A dense, lyrically beautiful and highly experimental debut. Composed of short passages open to multiple interpretations, it defies easy description. Annotations could be described as a bildungsroman, as a collection of short recits by unnamed and undetermined narrators, an elegy to the rise and fall of Keene's native St. Louis, a meditation on the African American influence there and much, much more. Keene's masterful prose smoothly transgresses traditional lines of representation and description without ever seeming like an exercise in multi-thematic chaos. Annotations is an experimental work that pinpoints a new direction for literary fiction in the 21st century." —Publishers Weekly

"Keene's slim first novel appears to be a disguised autobiographical narrative whose power resides in formidable imagery and the virtuoso use of language. The plot, if there is one, concerns a young black man's coming of age from birth to college years. Along the way while commenting aphoristically, he encounters many characters with unique personal outlooks and participates in gay and straight sexual experiences that he seems to avoid as often as not. But one does not read this book for its story. In fact, it should be read twice: once to get an idea of events and a second time to savor its language and pounding images. Keene's artistry makes him a writer to watch." —​Library Journal

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, February 25, 2016
Black in Latin America Film Series
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
We will screen the Black in Latin America film about the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Dinner and discussion will be part of the event. Co-hosted by Spanish Studies Program, BEOP Club, LASO, BSO and La Voz

Sponsored by: LAIS Program; La Voz; Spanish Studies
Jane Duffstein  845-758-7492  duffy@bard.edu
Thursday, February 11, 2016
Head-and-Shoulder-Hunting in the Americas:
Walter Freeman and the Visual Culture of Lobotomy
Miriam Posner,
Program Coordinator & Core Faculty,
Center for Digital Humanities, UCLA

RKC 103  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Between 1936 and 1967, Walter Freeman, a prominent neurologist, lobotomized as many as 3,500 Americans. Freeman was also an obsessive photographer, taking patients’ photographs before their operations and tracking them down years — even decades — later. In this presentation, Miriam Posner details her efforts to understand why Freeman was so devoted to this practice, using computer-assisted image-mining and -analysis techniques to show how these images fit into the larger visual culture of 20th-century psychiatry.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Experimental Humanities Program; Historical Studies Program; Science, Technology, and Society Program
Heidi Knoblauch  845-752-4385  hknoblau@bard.edu

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